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Orthopaedic Conditions

An expanding launch page to discover more about specific orthopaedic conditions

Our Philosophy

At Torrington Orthopaedics we do not just treat diseases...we treat patients. This approach means that we try to understand what each patient needs from us in order to maximise their potential. The two underlying principals are:


  • Would your pet sign the consent form for the proposed procedure?
  • Would the surgeon do the same with his or her own dog?


These are fundamental questions as the same pathologies in two different dogs or cats may have very different impacts on their pursuit of a quality of life. It is important therefore that we do not adopt a "one size fits all" approach to management. We need to believe that your pet would accept the proposed management options and if we cannot reach that conclusion then we will adopt a different line of management whilst we build a relationship with and understanding of your pet.

We will never take anything other than your dog's welfare into account before suggesting a form of management and if a condition can be managed medically rather than surgically we will often explore that option first. None of our surgeons have a "scalpels first" approach when dealing with Orthopaedic disease except in situations where surgery is the only realistic option to secure the best outcome.

We will always discuss risks and aftercare of different forms of management fully before adopting a specific treatment path and of course we will also discuss the financial implications of the different options.

Fracture Management

Using standard AO/ASIF Techniques and Implants.
Advanced Locking Plate System (ALPS) Kyon AG.
External Fixation (Linear and Circular)

Joint Surgery

Shoulder: OCD (Arthroscopy or Arthrotomy), Stabilisation.
Elbow: Elbow Dysplasia (By fragment retrieval, Proximal Abducting Ulnar Osteotomy [PAUL] or bi-oblique Osteotomy.
Humeral Intercondylar Fissure (HIF) or Incomplete Ossification of the Humeral Condyle (IOHC).
Carpus and Foot: Luxation and Fracture Management, Arthrodesis.
Hip: Management of Hip Dysplasia with modifying procedures or Cementless Total Hip Replacement.
Stifle: Management of Cruciate Ligament pathology by Tibial Tuberosity Advancement, Lateral and Medial Patellar Luxation (including Patella Groove Replacement), Femoral condylar OCD.
Hock: OCD management, Traumatic Luxation, Gastrocnemius Tendon Pathology.
Tarsus and Foot: Trauma management.

Spinal Surgery

Cervical Spine: Ventral slot surgery, Laminectomy, Distraction Fusion.
Thoracolumbar Spine: Hemilaminectomy, Foramenotomy, Laminectomy.
Lumbosacral Spine: Laminectomy-Discectomy, Distraction Fusion.

Investigation Techniques

Digital Radiography.
Computed Tomography (CT).
Visiting MRI (Burgess Diagnostics) on a weeky basis.
Arthroscopy.

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Info-Gallery

An expanding list...

Hip Dysplasia

A common cause of hindlimb lameness and gait abnormalities in young growing dogs, leading to osteoarthritis in later years.

Patellar Luxation

Seen as a clinical problem in all sizes of dogs and also in cats but most common in the smaller breeds of dog.

Cruciate Disease

This is the commonest cause of hindlimb lameness in dogs. It can be seen in dogs from 8 months of age and older.

Elbow Dysplasia

Most often seen in large and medium breeds from the age of 5-6 months of age and then later as a cause of Osteoarthritis.